As a beginner in web programming, I had never worked on any web development framework. Though I had a basic understanding of Python modular programming (i.e. I knew for loops, if else statements, functions and methods), HTML and CSS, these did not alleviate me any pain in understanding how the Rails framework works. In this article, I’m trying to share with you the path I’m taking to learn Ruby on Rails.

 

1. Advice for Complete Programming Newbies

If you are a complete starter in programming, I will strongly suggest you to learn the basics of HTML and CSS before starting on the adventure of RoR. A great place to start may be Codecademy.

 

2. Learn Rails before Learning Ruby?

Hell no!

Many people are suggesting the newbies to learn Rails before learning Ruby (I can’t imagine how anyone will be able to do that). In fact, I had gotten this advice myself when I was a complete starter. And I went on to start reading about Rails, assuring myself that it was OK not to understand any of the Ruby code. I just ended up not learning anything.

Ruby has some key elements that are totally different from other languages. Rails is a framework that is built on Ruby, trying to understand any of the Rails stuff without a basic understanding of Ruby will just prove to be a disaster.

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I’ve recently come across MacPaw’s CleanMyMac app, it is absolutely amazing. I’ve always thought these kind of Mac Apps to be useless, and removing content from your Mac using some unknown app can be quite dangerous. But after I’ve done some investigation on the issue where iCloud unknowingly took up a huge amount of space from my computer, as described in my previous post, I only regret that I’ve not used CleanMyMac earlier. It helps so much in identifying potentially useless content that takes up a huge amount of space.

Download From HERE: CleanMyMac3

I was shocked to find out that iPhoto stored 5GB of just rotated photos. You can definitely safely delete all the rotated photos, since you can get them back easily by rotating your current versions in iPhoto, no single information ever lost.

I was shocked to find out that iPhoto stored 5GB of just rotated photos. You can definitely safely delete all the rotated photos, since you can get them back easily by rotating your current versions in iPhoto, no information lost ever.

Cache files remembers your previous state in using that app. It helps in loading stuff faster. But as described in my previous post, an app can go haywire sometimes and store a huge amount of useless data in Cache. CleanMyMac helps you identify the large Cache files fast.

Cache files remembers your previous state in using that app. It helps in loading stuff faster. But as described in my previous post, an app can go haywire sometimes and store a huge amount of useless data in Cache. CleanMyMac helps you identify the large Cache files fast.

 

Yesterday night, as I was using my Mac, I got a pop-up warning saying that ‘Your storage is almost full‘. So I went on to clear my Trash can, downloads and some long-time-unused Apps. Eventually, I freed 18GB of my hard-drive space.

2 hours later, the same warning appeared again!

When I checked my Finder bottom bar, it showed that I am only left with 500MB!! If this was not scary enough, I watched the number decreasing from 500 to 498, 497, 496 …

I thought there must be some malicious programme trying to install a huge amount of stuff on my computer. But when I checked the Activity Network, the Data received/sec is only 4Kb, much less than the speed that my storage was filling up at. Nevertheless, a process name cloudd was taking up a substantial amount of CPU power.

I used the DaisyDisk app to help me check my storage.

Then I found the following stuff was taking up a HUGE amount of space (35GB):

/Users/[my username]/Library/Caches/CloudKit/com.apple.CloudDocs

That file was generated by the iCloud Drive cache activity. Hope that Apple will fix the serious bug soon.

Solution:

1. disable iCloud Drive through iCloud in System Preferences

2. delete the entire folder

/Users/[my username]/Library/Caches/CloudKit/com.apple.CloudDocs

 

P.S. You may also checkout the CleanMyMac app to identify and remove large redundant files from your system to make more space.

After I installed Yosemite, when I tried to open Eclipse (Java IDE) for the first time, I was prompted with the following error:

need to install legacy Java SE6 runtime

My solution:

First, install the latest Java update from the Java Control Panel in System Preferences

Click the circled Java Control Panel, install the updates from there

Click the circled Java Control Panel, install the updates from there

Then, I try to test my Java installation from the Terminal (find the built-in app in Launchpad) by typing the following command:
>>> java
And I get the following error:
No Java runtime present, requesting install.

So I downloaded the Java JDK (Java SE Development Kit 8u25) from:

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/downloads/jdk8-downloads-2133151.html

The problem is solved after installing the downloaded package. I can now successfully open my Eclipse.

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